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SUMMARY OF THE SUMMER ISSUE

Volume 14, No. 2, Summer 2006

Slovak Heritage Live

A quarterly newsletter published by Vladimir Linder

Summer issue was published in May 2006 and it was mailed to 1200 recipients world wide. 


FROM THE EDITOR
This issue is continuation of the Spring 2006 issue, published at the same time. You see I started to use new program and I am working out the bugs. Not all stories that I had anticipated in the spring issue fit in, therefore they are in this issue. Enjoy it.
Vladimir

You can find information about my services on my web pages:

http://www.slovakheritage.org/Shopping/Genrsrch/genealogical_research.htm
http://www.slovakheritage.org/Shopping/Videos/ancestral_videos.htm
http://www.slovakheritage.org/Shopping/Videos/ancestral_photography.htm

COMENIUS UNIVERSITY IN BRATISLAVA
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
INSTITUTE FOR LANGUAGE AND ACADEMIC PREPARATION (UJOP)
In winter 2005 issue of my newsletter, I mentioned to you that our daughter would start studying at UJOP in September.
UJOP is integral part of Comenius University-the oldest and largest university in Slovakia
and it has become an integral part of Centre for Continuing Education of Comenius University in Bratislava on November 26, 2004 according to UK rector decision.
It specializes in preparing international students for their study at all universities in Slovakia.
It is the only school offering full-time study of the Slovak language as a foreign language. It is the only school awarded the European Label for the project of assessing Slovak language proficiency.
The main UJOP goals at present are:
Complete preparation of international students for all levels of university studies in Slovakia-both in language and professional aspects teaching of Slovak as a foreign language in courses of various duration and extent (in full-time as well as part-time programs), testing and assessing of Slovak language proficiency as a foreign language, study stays of students studying the Slovak language at universities in abroad, publishing of own textbooks and study materials, marketing, promotion and recruitment of international students for university studies in Slovakia.
Our daughter Julia is enrolled in one year preparatory Slovak language course after which she will continue her studies at one of the universities. I paid US$ 4152.00 in tuition fees for the year and she departed Vancouver on Labor Day weekend, flew through London to Vienna where she was greeted by my friends the Dula Family. She was to have accommodation, as promised and agreed in written contract by the director of the school Dr. Libor Lubelec, in a dorm in Bratislava. This to my surprise didn’t happen and she had to go to Harmónia near the city of Modra some 20 kilometers from Bratislava. I was promised verbally and then in the contract that the accommodation has been arranged in student dorm DRUŽBA, walking distance to the study classrooms. Immediately after her arrival, the school broke the contract and they held us in believing for some time prior to her arrival, while they knew they would be unable to get her a dorm in Bratislava as they did for the scholarship students. Very strange, as to me, the money is the same and it should not make any difference who is paying, if it is the government or the student. You see the school has several types of students. There are students that study there on Slovak Government scholarship program for under developed countries that will continue their studies at one of the Slovak universities, after completing the mandatory yearlong Slovak Language course...

JOZEF LENHART
The Stories of Masters is the jubilee exhibition presenting works of Jozef Lenhart and Juraj Leporis, long‑term producers for the Centre for Folk Art Production.
A significant figure in woodcarving, leather and metal processing, Jozef Lenhart is a key represen­tative of folk art creation. Lenhart was raised in a small mountain village of Jalovec located within the upper Nitra River region between Prievidza and Handlová. Way of life, traditions and folk culture are deeply rooted in his heart. Being a long‑term museum worker, collector and restorer has affected Lenhart’s sympathy for traditions and assessing own work. Jozef Lenhart divided his work into two lines. He produced copies of traditional folk art objects that had changed function from daily use to interior decora­tion or historical exhibits in the course of time such as utensils for shepherds, particularly woo­den mugs from upper Nitra region, wide leather belts with massively decorated brass buckles, horn items, etc. Jozef Lenhart also used traditional techniques and patterns for production of daily use articles of our contemporaries such as traditionally decorated handbags and jewellery. Many years ago, I visited Ujčok Lenhart at his workshop in Bojnice. I was happy to be able to se so much more of his work on display at the exhibit.

JURAJ LEPORIS
The Stories of Masters is the jubilee exhibition presenting works of Jozef Lenhart and Juraj Leporis, long‑term producers for the Centre for Folk Art Production.
nheritor of the craft from his father (a notable wood turning craftsman from the upper Nitra region), Juraj Leporis is a creative artist. An orphan from early childhood, Leporis was apprenticed in carpentry and has devoted all his efforts to woodturning. He achieved excellence in the craft working as a furniture maker in a Bata factory. Leporis gained deeper understanding of wood pro­cessing through long cooperation with the Centre for Folk Art Production, and Professor Václav Kautman in particular. Craft production is closely linked to sufficient materials and technical equ­ipment, the elements Leporis had lost in 1950 and found in 1960’s. Juraj Leporis produces daily use articles with sense for natural beauty of material. The artisan processes domestic woods taking into account their natural character, density, smell, structure and colors. Leporis makes smooth wooden pieces with limited surface finishing, stains poplar wood, produces maple utensils with no surface finishing, plays with natural colors of various fruitwoods, structure of ash and loftiness of walnut wood. Among his top works are large wooden sculptures intended for daily use.

MAUTHAUSEN CONCENTRATION CAMP IN AUSTRIA
On August 8, 1938, just a few weeks after the Nazi occupation of Austria, prisoners from the Dachau, concentration camp near Munich, were transferred to the Austrian town of Mauthausen, near Linz.
They were brought to the rock quarry there, known as the “Wiener Graben,” where they began to build the granite fortress-prison of the main camp, mostly with their blood, bodies, bare hands and backs. It was known as the “mother camp” for all of Austria, comprising some 49 sub-camps. Between Aug. 8, 1938 and May 5, 1945, about 195, 000 persons, men and women, were forced into these camps. Most of the people were imprisoned under the Nazi “protective custody” laws, that is, they were considered dangerous to the Third Reich of Germany and Austria, and therefore, these two nations, now joined, had to be “protected” from these people because of their racial origin, nationality, political affiliation or religious belief. It should be noted that Austria contributed more volunteers for the SS, per capita, than did Germany.
The Mauthausen camp was one of the most infamous in the entire Nazi alternate universe of human destruction. Many people, most of whom were innocent of any crimes, were tortured to death in its rock quarry, and in the tunnels of Mauthausen-Gusen, the most infamous of the sub-camps. The policy of death through work was instituted by Chief of SS, Reichsfuhrer Heinrich Himmler. Prisoners were to be given only the most primitive tools, and also, whenever possible, they were to work with their bare hands. This policy was known as “Primitivbauweise.” In Mauthausen it resulted in a harsh, stone world, deprived of any human kindness and compassion. It is there today still... sitting on a small mountaintop in the astonishingly beautiful and bucolic Austrian countryside, maintained by the Austrian government.
Prisoners were forced to climb the 186 steps of the Wiener Graben with large blocks of granite on their backs. Often the blocks would fall, crushing limbs and bodies of those following, sometimes killing. The SS guards invented competitions betting on which prisoner would make it to the top first. Those surviving the ordeal would then be forced to jump from the edge of the quarry to their death below. This particular spot at the edge of the quarry was known “The Parachute Jump.”
“...in 1944 ...The SS led forty-seven Dutch, American, and English officers and flyers, barefooted, to the bottom. On their first journey up the 186 steps, they forced the men to carry twenty-five kilogram stones on their backs. On each successive journey, they increased the weight of the load. If a prisoner fell, he was beaten. All forty-seven died of the treatment.”...

THE DOBŠINSKÁ ICE CAVE NATIONAL NATURE MONUMENT
Cadastral area: Dobšiná
District: Rožňava
Region: Košice

THE DOBŠINSKÁ ICE CAVE,
Is situated in the Slovak Paradise in the Spiš-Gemer Karst in the National Nature Reserve Stratená within the territory of the Slovak Paradise National Park. Entrance to the cave is on the northern slope of Duča hill, 971 meters above the sea level.
The cave was formed in the Middle Triassic Steinalm and Wetter­ stein limestones of the Silický nappe along the tectonic faults and interbed surfaces, by the former underground stream of Hnilec river at three developmental levels. It belongs to the genetic system of the Stratenská Cave. The cave length is 1232 meters and vertical range is 112 meter
Ice filling occurs in the form of ground ice, ice “waterfalls,” ice stalagmites and columns. The ice-covered area is 9772 square meters, and the total volume of ice is 110132 cubic meters. The maximum thickness of ice is in the Great Hall 26.5 meters. It ranks among the most important ice caves in the world thanks to its character of glaciations. The cave is one of the most important winter refuges of bats-Myotis mystacinus and Myotis brandti in Slovakia.
The cave was discovered in 1870 by E. Ruffmi assisted by G. Lang, A. Mega, and F. Fehér. It was open to the public as early as in 1871. Since 1887 it has been the first cave with electric illumination in that-time Hungary. Along with Postojna Cave it ranks among the first electrically illuminated caves in Europe. Currently, 475 meters of the cave are open to the public. I have visited the cave in 1994 and 1996.

STATE MUSEUM IN OŚWIECIM-AUSCHWITZ BIRKENAU
All over the world, Auschwitz has become a symbol of terror, genocide, and the Holocaust. It was established by the Nazis in 1940, in the suburbs of Oswiecim, a Polish city that was annexed to the Third Reich by the Nazis. Its name was changed to Auschwitz, which also became the name of Konzentrationslager Auschwitz. The camp was established in mid-1940, more than a year before the Germans embarked upon the “Endlösung der Judenfrage” (Final Solution of the Jewish Question)-the plan, systematically carried out, to murder all the Jews living in the countries occupied by the Third Reich. The direct reason for the establishment of the camp was the fact that mass arrests of Poles were increasing beyond the capacity of existing “local” prisons. Initially, Auschwitz was to be one more concentration camp of the type that the Nazis had been setting up since the early 1930s. It functioned in this role throughout its existence, even when at beginning in 1942, it also became the largest of the death camps.
The location of the camp, practically in the center of German-occupied Europe, and its convenient transportation connections, led the Nazis to expand Auschwitz on an enormous scale and deport people here from almost all of Europe. At its peak, the camp was composed of three parts:
The first and oldest was the so-called “main camp,” later also known as “Auschwitz I” (the number of prisoners fluctuated around 15,000, sometimes rising above 20,000), which was established on the grounds and in the buildings of prewar Polish army barracks;
The second part was the Birkenau camp (which held over 90,000 prisoners in 1944) also known as “Auschwitz II.” This was the largest part of the Auschwitz complex. The Nazis began building it in 1941 on the site of the village of Brzezinka, three kilometers from Oswiecim. The Polish civilian population was evicted and their houses confiscated and demolished. The greater part of the apparatus of mass extermination was built in Birkenau and the majority of the victims were murdered here.
More than 40 sub-camps, exploiting the prisoners as slave laborers, established mainly at various sorts of German industrial plants and farms, between 1942 and 1944. The largest of them was called Buna (Monowitz, with ten thousand prisoners) and was opened by the camp administration in 1942 on the grounds of the Buna-Werke synthetic rubber and fuel plant six kilometers from the Auschwitz camp. The factory was built during the war by the German IG Farbenindustrie cartel, and the SS supplied prisoner labor.
On November 1943, the Buna sub-camp became the seat of the commandant of the third part of the camp, “Auschwitz III,” to which some other Auschwitz sub-camps were subordinated...

SLOVAKIA'S SUMMER  FOLKLORE FESTIVALS 2006


22. TURČIANSKE SLÁVNOSTI FOLKLÓRU
22. TURIEC FOLKLORE FESTIVAL
June 16-18
 
This will be the 22nd year of Turiec celebration of folklore. Turiec is a county in north central part of Slovakia that covers large territory around the town of Martin. Information: 011-421-43-413-2394, e-mail: [email protected]

30. ZAMAGURSKÉ FOLKLÓRNE SLÁV­NOSTI
30. ZAMAGURIE FOLKLORE FESTIVAL
June 9-11
Folk festival of under Tatras region in Čer­vený Kláštor with international participants. 
Information: 011-421-52-772-2466, e-mail: [email protected] 

 47. FOLKLÓRNE SLÁVNOSTI MYJAVA 2004
47. FOLK FESTIVAL MYJAVA 2005
June 16-18

47th year of international folklore festival-member CIOFF. Presentation of folk art from western Slovakia region with participation of folklore groups from whole Slovakia and abroad. Myjava is in Western Slovakia on the South side of White Carpathian Mountains and about 4 miles from Moravian border. Information: Dom kultúry s.r.o., Partizánska 290/17,  907 01 Myjava, Information: 011-421-34-621 2588, email: [email protected] 

37. ŠARIŠŠKÉ FOLKLÓRNE SLÁVNOSTI IN RASLAVICE
37. ŠARIŠ FOLKLORE CELEBRATIONS IN RASLAVICE

June 16-18
There is a folk group Raslavičan here, just great and this festival is great as well.

52. SLÁVNOSTI KULTÚRY RUSÍNOV-UKRAJINCOV SLOVENSKA-SVIDNÍK
52.FFOLKLORE FESTIVAL OF RUTHENIANS AND UKRAINIANS-SVIDNÍK
June 16-18

CASSOVIA FOLK FEST 2006
June 22- 25

International Folklore Festival included in the Traditional Days of Slovak Culture. There are many programs on different stages throughout Košice amphitheatre, Jumbo center, Main Street, historic City Hall. There is also children music folklore competition.
Informtion: Kultobin s.r.o. (Dom ľudového tanca), Starozagorská 10, 040 23 Košice. Tel.: 011-421-55-789 4717, 15, 
011-421-905-241-030, e-mail: [email protected][email protected],  www.zeleziar.sk/ke.html, www.folkfest.sk

EUROFOLKLÓR A HOREHRONSKÉ DNI SPEVU A TANCA
EUROFOLKLOR AND UPPER HRON FESTIVAL OF SONGS AND DANCES
June 23-25

41st Folk festival of Upper Hron days of songs and dances in Heľpa central Slovakia. Information: 011-421-48-412-5206, e-mail: [email protected]  

MEDZINÁRODNÝ FOLKLÓRNY FES­TIVAL STRÁŽNICE
INTERNATIONAL FOLK FESTIVAL STRÁŽNICE
June 23-25

60th year of the Strážnice international festival. This also will be the eight year of the central European folk festival CIOFF.

KLENTOVSKÁ RONTOVKA GEMER-LITTLE HONT FOLKLORE FESTIVAL
June 23-25

27th year. Traditional courtyards, market of traditional crafts, specialties of Slovak folk cuisine. Folklore groups, soloists, bag pipe players. Location is KLENOVEC, in District of Rimavská Sobota. Information: 011-421-563-1095 email: [email protected]

O, OUR JOHN, OUR JOHN
JUNE 25
Ján’s folk customs coupled with magical rituals original to traditional, simple folk environment. Performances of different folk groups. Museum of Liptov village, Pribylina. Information 011-421-44-522-2485, e-mail: [email protected]
www.liptovskemuzeum.sk

FOLKLÓRNY FESTIVAL VÝCHODNÁ   C A N C E L L E D
FOLK FESTIVAL VÝCHODNÁ
June 30- July 2

This will be its 51st year of the festival. Only the best folk dance and folk singing groups of Slovakia perform at this festi­val. The festival has also international participa­tion of non-Slovak folk dance groups.
Information: 011-421-2-529-14115, email: [email protected]

ST. CYRIL AND METHODIUS DAY
Devín’s Castle, July 3

FOLKLÓRNE SLÁVNOSTI POD POĽANOU, DETVA
FOLK FESTIVAL UNDER POĽANA, DETVA
July 7-9
This will be the 41st year of the festival. Main emphasis of the festival is to show the folklore and folk traditions of this central Slova­kia region, with guest per­formances of groups from around Slovakia. On Sunday morning traditionally, there is a program called “Sunday with our countrymen.” and Slovak groups from around the world perform alongside with Slovak groups. 
Information: 011-421-45-545-5581, email: [email protected]

HORŇÁCKE SLÁVNOSTI
HORNACK’S CELEBRATIONS
VELKÁ NAD VELIČKOU-MORAVIA
July 14-16


Velká nad Veličkou is about 8 miles North of Myjava in Moravia in the Czech republic. This is a festival of festivals and musicians play here almost nonstop for three days.

SPOMIENKY STARÝCH NÔT FUJÁR
REMEMBERING THE OLD NOTES OF FUJARAS
July 22
All Slovakia performance of fujara players in honor of the dean of Detva’s fujara players Jožka Rybára. Korytárky, house of culture and Roman Catholic Church
Information: Spolok slovenských fujarášov, Roman Malatinec, Korytárky 313, 962 04 Korytárky,
phone:  011-45-546-62 44,   cell 011-421-905-869-576 email: [email protected]

44. ROČNÍK MEDZINÁRODNÉHO FOLKLÓRNEHO FESTIVALU JÁNOŠÍKOVE DNI 2005
44. YEAR OF INTERNATIONAL FOLKLORE FESTIVAL JANOŠÍK DAYS 2005
TERCHOVÁ
 August 3-6
I was there four summers ago and it was great. Many groups from the region are performing at this festival.
Information: 011-421-41-569-5129, email: [email protected] 

XI. FOLKLÓRNY FESTIVAL POD KRÁĽOVOU HOĽOU
XI. FOLKLORE FESTIVAL UNDER KRÁĽOVÁ HOĽA
LIPTOVSKÁ TEPLIČKA 2005
August 5-6

This is the 11th  year of a truly fantastic festival with everyone in the village joining in. Groups from both sides of Kráľová Hoľa, Liptov, Spiš and Upper Hron and different regions of Slovakia and always at least one group from abroad participate. Information: Miestne kultúrne stredisko, 059 40 Liptovská Teplička, phone: 011-421-52-779-8110, email: [email protected]

31. PODROHÁČSKE FOLKLÓRNE SLÁVNOSTI ZUBEREC-BRESTOVÁ
31. PDROHÁČSKE FOLKLORE CELEBRATIONS
August 4-6
Orava’s folklor
e is the theme here. Location is close to the open-air museum in Zuberec-Berestová. This is a small but very nice festival with international participation. 
Information: 011-421-43-586-4928, e-mail: [email protected] 

KOLIESKO
KOKAVA NAD RIMAVICOU
August 11-13

This is the 15th year of festival of young folklorists with many innovative ideas. Small, but great. The villagers open their house courtyards and people sing and dance in them all night long after the official festival programs. This is a great festival. 
Information: 011-421-47-429-3104, e-mail: [email protected]

ECHOES OF OLD SLAVIC LANGUAGE UNDER KRAĽOVA HOĽA
OZVENY STAROSLOVIENČINY POD KRÁĽOVOU HOĽOU V TELGÁRTE
August 12-13

12th Ecumenical festival of folk and sacral songs. Place: Telgárt, Greek-catholic church, Kráľova Hoľa, house of culture; Dobšiná, Rožňava, Poprad, Brezno, Gemerská Poloma, Šumiac. Information: Mária Knižková, Základná škola, 976 73 Telgárt, 011-421-48-619-4394, email: [email protected]

XI. HONTIANSKA PARÁDA
XI. HONT’S PARADE HRUŠOV 2002
August 18-19

This is a regional festival of the Hont region. Meeting with the traditional culture in the frame of agro tourism. Folklore programs are a part of sampling or the traditional ways activities such as bread baking, wood working, sampling of pear brandy, working with hay, traditional cooking, open folk scene, horseback riding and many more. Place: Hrušov, amphitheater, house of culture, and the whole village.
Information 011-421- 47-488 –0122, e-mail: [email protected]

GEMERS’S FOLKLORE FESTIVAL REJDOVÁ 2004
August 26

33rd year of presentation of folklore, folk customs, traditions and folk crafts from Gemer and other regions of Slovakia and from abroad.
Rejdová, Information: 011-421-58-732-4258, e-mail: [email protected] 

Our information about the festivals is deemed correct, but is not guaranteed. Please phone ahead before making your final arrangements to participate

MILAN RASTISLAV ŠTEFÁNIK
July 21, 1880-May 4, 1919
Milan Rastislav Štefánik was born into the family of a Protestant priest in Košariská on July 21, 1880. After his schooling in Szarvas he studied astronomy at Charles University in Prague where he received a doctorate of philosophy. In 1904, he moved to Paris to begin his scientific career.
France became his second homeland. His efforts brought him success in the famous Meudon Observatory, led by Jules Janssen. So, he began his tours of the world. Six times, he climbed Mont Blanc, where Meudon Observatory had established its astronomical observatory. To observe the eclipse of the sun he traveled to Spain and Turkistan. After the death of Jules Janssen in 1907, however, his scientific career at Meudon ended. Štefánik sought to apply his talents elsewhere and dreamed of his own observatory. The search for a suitable location for the observatory brought him first to North Africa (1909); in Tahiti, he observed the passage of Halley’s comet (1910). He saw the total eclipse of the sun at Vavau Island in the Pacific and observed the eclipse of the sun in Brazil (1912). His last pre‑war journey was, however, more of a diplomatic than scientific character. As a French citizen, he traveled to Ecuador to persuade the relevant circles to order the construction of telegraphic network in Ecuador and the Galapagos in France. The mission was successfully accomplished and Štefánik was awarded the cross of the knight of the Legion of Honor, and won recognition in the highest French political and cultural circles. Shortly before the outbreak of the World War I, he traveled again to North Africa. He documented these travels over all continents in photographs.
Štefánik experienced the most important part of his life during World War I. As a French citizen, he joined the French Army and found his place in the Air Force. His military accomplishments were impressive. During the first three years of the war, he was promoted from corporal to General of the French Army. Besides his successes as a pilot, his career also included diplomatic achievements, and Štefánik became one of the main organizers of the Czechoslovak Army‑the legions fighting alongside the Entente to establish an independent Czechoslovak state. Štefánik became Vice‑Chairman of the Czechoslovak National Council in Paris, led by Tomáš Garique Masaryk. After the end of the First World War, this goal became reality. However, as Štefánik was flying from Italy back to his liberated homeland on May 4, 1919, his plane crashed in Ivanka near Bratislava.
.. 

SLOVAK HISTORY CHRONOLOGY & LEXICON
This book is in English
The book (350 pages) is divided into two sections.

The first section, the calendar, presents Slovak history from the first evidence about human beings on Slovak territory up to the events that took place in 1998 with notations summarizing important historical events and phenomena.
The second section is an encyclopedic dictionary with three hundred alphabetically arranged entries characterizing the most important concepts, institutions, and events. It includes genealogical tables of the longest reigning dynasties on the Hungarian throne, a list of all rulers and presidents of states to which the lands of Slovakia belonged (Great Moravia, the Kingdom of Hungary, Austria, Czechoslovakia and Slovakia).
Six historians from Bratislava prepared this chronology of Slovak history (J. Bartl, V. Segeš, V. Čičaj, D. Škvarna-main author, R. Letz and M. Kohútová).
It is said that the way to the knowledge of the present leads through a knowledge of the past. Therefore, this book can be recommended to all readers, who are interested in the Slovak history as well as to those, who are involved in genealogical research.
We can only welcome this book trying to fill the gap because until now, Slovak history was not sufficiently covered and to a very limited extent in the English language.
It is not frequent to mention the translator’ s name, but an exception in this case is allowed, thank you David P. Daniel for your excellent translation.

Reviewed by: Miroslava Dulová

COST US$99.95
plus US$9.95 shipping and handling
TOTAL US$109.90
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Obrázkový slovník slovenčiny
ILLUSTRATED DICTIONARY OF THE SLOVAK LANGUAG
Author: Oľga Škvareninová
This illustrated dictionary is intended for each and everybody with the intention to improve his or her knowledge of the Slovak language.
It includes approximately 3 000 selected words, more than the basic thesaurus.
The dictionary is divided into six individual titles and accompanied by a register at the end.
The individual titles are:
People and their surroundings
Nature
Working environment
Transportation
Leisure and sport
Art and science

ONLY FIVE BOOKS AVAILABLE
COST US$35.95 each 
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TOTAL US$41.90
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SLOVAK FOLK DANCES
Mária Mázorová, Kliment Ondrejka and colleagues
This book is in Slovak.


It contains:Map of folklore regions of Slovakia
Detailed choreographies and songs including music sheets from following regions: ZEMPLÍN, GEMER, LIPTOV, GORAL, PODPOĽANIE, MYJAVA, ŠARIŠ and SPIŠ, NITRA and TEKOV, HONT, NOVOHRAD and ZVOLEN, TRENČÍN and KYSUCE, PODUNAJ and ZÁHORIE.
The text is supplied with 106 color photographs, 159 black and white photographs of the folk dress, folklore groups, prominent dancers and musicians in the authentic version; 388 black and white photographs of the dance motives performed by the members of some outstanding ensembles, 174 songs and folk scores, the folklore map of the Slovakia.
The work The Slovak folk dances is the complex and systematic publication from the sphere of the Slovak dance folklore and with it close associated kinds of the folk art, which were developing together with the dance, were influencing each other and formed often one entirety.
This work is the result of the needs and requirements of all those who are concerned with the folk dance and the folk art. It represents the picture of the past expressing that the Slovak folk dance and the folk art have kept substantially the form of the classic art because their characteristic elements can be found in all periods of the development and are preserved until the present time.
With the aim of saving our cultural heritage (folk dance, music, songs, dress) for the contemporaries and the future generations in its full beauty, the authors pass to the readers with high professionalism their life long knowledge and experiences acquired in research and professional work in the folk ensembles.
In the first chapters of the book the general characteristics of the dance folklore, the musical folklore and the folk dress in the Slovakia is presented so as their samples have been preserved for us since the old times until those of the beginning of the 20th century.
In the next part twenty folklore regions are presented in detail: the regions of Zemplín, Gemer and Horehronie, Liptov, Tatra’s highlanders, Poľana, Myjava, Šariš, Spiš, Nitra, Tekov, Orava, Turiec, Hont, Novohrad, Zvolen, Trenčín, Kysuce, Danube lowlands and Záhorie. The complete typical picture of the separate regions is offered. The location, settlement, the survey of many known dances, descriptions of the dances, musical folklore, folk dress. At those regions where the most peculiar Slovak dances originated, also the detailed descriptions of the dance motives are given.
The work is intended for all who admire the folk dance, especially for the dancing masters, young people who attend dancing schools, the amateur and professional dance ensembles. It will be of good use for the choreographers, dress designers and for all those who are engaged in the folklore and want to acquire further professional knowledge and experience in this sphere. But certainly it will please everybody who is interested in the beauty of the Slovak folklore, its richness and variety.
We believe that the book will inspire all its readers with admiration for the creation of unknown folk artists of the long and the recent past. At the same time it will help all bearers of the traditions to keep and propagate the most beautiful jewels of the Slovak national culture.

This hard cover book is available now

in very limited quantities 
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3804 Yale Street
Burnaby  BC   V5C 1P6  CANADA

 

SLOVAK BETHLEHEM POST CARDS

For sample issue of The Slovak Heritage Live Newsletter, please send US$2.00
together with your postal address to:

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Burnaby, BC,
Canada, V5C 1P6
Phone/Fax: 1-604-291-8065

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Copyright © Vladimir Linder 2006 
3804 Yale Street, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada V5C 1P6
The above article and photographs may not be copied, reproduced, republished, or redistributed by any means including electronic, without the express written permission of Vladimir Linder. All rights reserved.